Coming To Terms With Our Illusion Of Security

Community Chaplain Offers Innovative Workshop

Though Sarasota-Manatee avoided Hurricane Ian’s direct landfall, the devastation, loss of life, and displacement experienced only a short distance down the coast has left a lingering sense of vulnerability and survivor’s guilt. 

Regardless of the sentiment that our area is shielded from a hurricane’s bull’s-eye due to the providential protection afforded by local Native American burial grounds, we know that what happened in Fort Myers and Sanibel could easily have happened to us. Yes, we are relieved to have once again been spared but do we feel secure knowing there will be more hurricanes to worry about in the future?

Truth be told, even before Ian, our mental health had already been adversely impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic, the growing existential threat posed by climate change, the senseless violence in our schools and streets, the U.S.’ intensifying political divisions, tension with China, the conflict in Ukraine, and economic uncertainty. 

While we live in an age of unparalleled human advancement, we also now perceive in greater measure the potential threat of fearsome, indiscriminate forces beyond our control. We are aware that the blessing of life is inherently fragile.  At the same time, we have embraced the illusion that modernity itself serves to insulate us from many threats. With the recognition of the extent to which this illusion no longer holds, many of us are experiencing an emotional and spiritual reeling. 

How can we constructively deal with and work through the precariousness of our time? How can we build defense mechanisms that still enable us to derive joy, value, and meaning? 

Community Chaplain Rabbi Jonathan R. Katz will explore these inescapable questions in a free, innovative, three-session workshop. Rabbi Katz brings a wealth of experience and expertise, both in terms of knowledge and methodology to this area of focus.  

Details:

When: Tuesday mornings, November 8, 15, and 22, from 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Where: JFCS’s main office, 2688 Fruitville Road, Sarasota

Cost: Free and open to all

To register: Contact Rabbi Katz at jkatz@jfcs-cares.org or 941-366-2224 ext. #166